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Dave Winer's Scripting News Weblog "In this release I also wired up both the Blogger API and the MetaWeblog API to Radio's SOAP interface. It would be interesting to see a blogging tool in .Net or other environments that have strong SOAP support. Maybe this is what the SOAP world is waiting for -- something to work on that has clear benefits to users. All the consorting and sparring among the Big's has yielded little utility so far, mostly science projects." (bolding is mine, not the Dave's; ed.)

Dave makes a great point about the "science projects" underway in the BigCos; however, in defense of the BigCos (as I am employed by one!), the lack of acceptable security standards in many web services implementations prevents adoption for any serious (aka revenue or ROI-related) transactional stuff. However, Radio and RCS may have hit the sweet spot for delivering real business value on top of a web services-based platform. Can the BigCos offer something similar? Certainly. Will they? It's anybody's guess, but history tends to indicate they'll be blind-sided by this in the same way they've been blind-sided by other technology groundswells (anyone remember Mosaic?).

Comments

Anonymous said…
It agree, rather useful idea

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