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High-speed access debate goes to D.C. - Tech News - CNET.com -- "WASHINGTON--Hotly contested legislation that would give regional telephone giants a boost in the high-speed Internet market is set to be considered in the U.S. House of Representatives this week."

The Baby Bells are whining that they need favorable legislation in order to compete with cable operators offering broadband. Unwilling to accept any risk, the telcos want the feds to give them an insurance policy (read "subsidy") to offset their long-needed investments in fiber infrastructure. If they'd gotten off the dime several years ago and laid the optical infrastructure they so desparately need, they'd be in a better competitive position with respect to the cable companies. My advice to the telcos -- stop whining, build out, and watch the subscription rates rise.

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