Skip to main content

OLPC project clarifies: no plans for Windows support



I'm a big OLPC fan, and an advocate of open source. When news surfaced over the last few weeks of a Windows-based version, I was concerned about the potential negative impact of commercial forces on the admittedly idealistic goals of OLPC.

It turns out that the way AP and other news sources reported the original story, attributing comments (but not directly quoting) Nicholas Negroponte, head of the nonprofit organization operating the OLPC project, mischaracterized the relationship between OLPC and Microsoft, drawing implications which may occur as a result of market forces but not due to any special relationship between OLPC and Microsoft.

The following quote from Walter Bender, president of Software and Content at OLPC, certainly clarified things for me:

"We are a free and open-source shop. We have no one from OLPC working with Microsoft on developing a Windows platform for the XO. MS doesn't get any special treatment from OLPC."


In re-reading several of the previous reports, it's unclear to me whether the writers intentionally obfuscated Negroponte's comments, or in their enthusiasm for the getting the story out were simply careless in their choice of words. Whatever the intention, the result was clearly a different story than the reality of the situation.

In any case, I'm happy to learn that OLPC will proceed on its mission focused on its own revolutionary software platform, and that XO owners will at least begin their experience of computers with something other than Microsoft Windows.

Mind you, I'm not against the use of Windows on OLPC, but would rather see market forces dictate the final added value (and accompanying cost) of any commercial software, including Microsoft Windows. I'm thinking that the company's recently announced $3 bundle gets pretty close to the mark.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

On My Own - Doing It By The Numbers
Over the weekend I got my first call on a consulting opportunity.  A few calls later I realized something - I hadn't figured out how to price my "product!"
It's pretty hard for someone to buy something (or even determine whether they're interested) if they don't know the price.
Of course, that realization came after I nailed down something even more important...my resume.
I promised lots of friends, colleagues and former co-workers that I'd let them know how things are going, so I plan to catalog the steps in my process here on my blog in the unlikely event that someone else decides to pursue a similar path.
I know this has probably all been written about before, but some of us are just too darned bull-headed to learn lessons from other people and need to make our own mistakes, carve our own paths.
Step #1 - Define Your Product (aka Update Your Resume)
I know most people probably keep their resumes current by looking at what t…
First Day
Started today with coffee in bed until 9am, then got down to business.

Earlier this week, after being notified I would be leaving my employer, I decided to take advantage of the company's Employee Purchase Plan (EPP) with Apple. I walked into the Ridgedale Apple Store and picked out a Mac Pro dual Xeon quad-core 2.8GHz CPU, an Apple Wireless Keyboard, a couple of 20" Apple Cinema Displays, and the 10-user edition of Mac OS X Server. I decided that, as part of defining my work, I needed to make sure my productivity wasn't hampered by under-powered technology.  I want to be able to do some serious computing, and there's nothing more powerful and affordable than the Mac Pro.
I'm happy to say that I'm writing this entry on my new Mac Pro, although I haven't yet installed Mac OS X Server (that'll come later, once I've planned out disk partitioning and digital workspace mechanics).
Working (and Living) Green
One of the things I've neglected u…