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Showing posts from January 11, 2009
First Day
Started today with coffee in bed until 9am, then got down to business.

Earlier this week, after being notified I would be leaving my employer, I decided to take advantage of the company's Employee Purchase Plan (EPP) with Apple. I walked into the Ridgedale Apple Store and picked out a Mac Pro dual Xeon quad-core 2.8GHz CPU, an Apple Wireless Keyboard, a couple of 20" Apple Cinema Displays, and the 10-user edition of Mac OS X Server. I decided that, as part of defining my work, I needed to make sure my productivity wasn't hampered by under-powered technology.  I want to be able to do some serious computing, and there's nothing more powerful and affordable than the Mac Pro.
I'm happy to say that I'm writing this entry on my new Mac Pro, although I haven't yet installed Mac OS X Server (that'll come later, once I've planned out disk partitioning and digital workspace mechanics).
Working (and Living) Green
One of the things I've neglected u…
Bless me Father, for I have not blogged

With the exception of yesterday's post about Mac OS X and Windows 7, it's been over a year since I last blogged here, and nearly two years since I've posted anything technical. I went underground during that time, focusing on writing intranet blogs and articles and neglecting the "real world." As of today, I no longer have an intranet to blog to (I was laid off), so it's time once again to turn my attention to what's going on out here on the big, bad Internet.

Watch this space in coming days for my thoughts on Apple products, personal productivity in the enterprise, mobile and remote workforce technology, and virtualization (along with meanderings into a wide variety of other topics).
CNET - Will Windows 7 stymie Mac OS X's growth?

Earlier this week a colleague sent me a link to a CNET blog entry with the above title, and remarked, "Maybe he's on drugs."

I'm not so sure he's on drugs, but I'm also unwilling to concede that Windows 7 will stall (or reverse) the growth trend in Mac marketshare. The reasons people buy Apple products revolves around the entire experience, not just around the operating system. If you've ever visited the Genius Bar at an Apple Retail store, you'll understand part of what I mean by the entire experience.

It's about how the hardware and software fit together so exactly. It's about how information and content flows seamlessly from one device to another device to the Internet and back. It's about how, when you call Apple, you almost always feel satisfied after you've hung up. It's about walking into an Apple Store and seeing your name on the video queue showing how many other guests will…