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A New Leaf



Looking back at my posts, it's clear I've been an inconsistent writer at best; most would probably accuse me (and rightly so) of lacking the drive to stay with it. Well, I'm turning over a new leaf and will write regardless of the consequences.

Part of what's held me back is my personal fear of losing my job because I revealed something I wasn't supposed to. I've also struggled with an inferiority complex, and having people comment (or, worse, NOT comment!) on my writing still leaves me a bit queasy.

Anyway, now that I've grappled with my personal demons, let's get into the thick of things.

Today I had a call with representatives from TeamStudio to discuss the merits of their software and service offerings. As I expect has happened at many large companies using Lotus Notes/Domino, the application environment has evolved organically, and with limited governance. Many of those developing Notes/Domino applications operate outside traditional IT, instead reporting within business teams. Since the process of creating Notes applications can be pretty simple, most "professional" developers believe it's not something real programmers need to consider or be concerned with. And since these are the folks who most often drive formal IT infrastructure, Notes/Domino and its more casual developer community tend to be left out in the cold when it comes to effective tools for managing the application lifecycle.

This is the gap TeamStudio sees itself bridging, and based on the brief conversation we had today, along with a quick scan of their product portfolio, I'd say we'll be speaking more in the near future. The challenge will be justifying the resource and financial investments necessary to achieve the expected benefits, when there are so many other important initiatives to pursue.

Ah, I guess that's why they pay me the big bucks ;)...

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