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J2EE vs. .NET -- Great discussion on this subject...I found this comment particularly interesting:

"One thing I feel positive about: J2EE is much more successful in promoting code re-use. When I say code re-use I'm not referring to (in Microsoft parlance) component aggregation and extension. I'm talking about old fashion OO fundamentals. Microsoft is always touting binary (component) re-use and this is obviously good practice. I have read a myriad of articles and books where Microsoftonians say that traditional OO code re-use just never worked out that well; they obviously haven't implemented to many projects or architectures using a quality OO language such as SmallTalk or Java! I have found that J2EE projects almost always have a healthy share of both component reuse AND general OO reuse. Not every piece of code you write is going to end up as a component/EJB. My current project has a wonderful framework of Java classes that is constantly being extended through normal OO inheritance. Obviously this is possible in the Microsoft world if you choose the right language and are careful to enforce the right project policies but this happens far less frequently than in the Java world where it just seems to occur more naturally. For this reason alone I prefer J2EE for companies that are using an ASP model and require great flexibility."

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